Back to British Columbia

 

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We got our first hotel last night and it felt great to be warm and get some good, and much-needed, sleep. We set the alarm for six after laying down at midnight so we could sleep in. I usually feel reluctant to remove myself from warm covers and this morning was no different. We got to the Port Angeles Ferry at 8:15 and bought a $16 ticket for two people in an SUV for the next boat leaving in 30 minutes. This gave us enough time to park in lane 7, read the informational wall, and walk around some to get a view of Port Townsend and the bay.

leaving Port Angeles

leaving Port Angeles

I called my mom and checked on the funeral situation. She forgot it was Monday and had been busy looking at pictures and meeting my cousins kids. It’s sad they have to meet under these conditions, but I’m glad she is able to reconnect with family that she hasn’t seen in years. I drove onto the ferry and parked and only when it started to move did I jump out of the car. I have an obsession with seeing and feeling the movement and wanted to enjoy the moment with Caleb. We were saving hours by going around Seattle via Whidbey Island versus driving around the outer edge of the city.

Caleb's first gray hair

Caleb’s first gray hair

I hung up with Mom and we took a tour of the boat looking at the few other passengers, the food available, the puzzles on the tables, the safety equipment for fire or sinkage, and the changing view out different windows. There were a lot of birds on driftwood and no whale sightings. I stood at angles to be out of the fiercest wind and it seemed we were already nearing the port near Coupeville. We drove through the northern part of the island and it seemed too short. I pointed out the seafood restaurant where I ate with my aunt and grandma, and the ice cream shop where I had dessert with his aunt and uncle.

reflections on the ferry

reflections on the ferry

We stopped at Deception Pass and walked one side of the bridge and then the other. This was my fourth visit and I hadn’t been to the beach yet, so down we went. We passed a parking lot that puts you closer to the bottom and continued our descent to the people fishing – one guy dropping his catch on the rocks so I could watch their silver bellies flop about as they suffocated to death – not the view I was going for. The dogs would’ve appreciated the exercise, but we still don’t have leashes for them since they accidentally got packed.

silk worms at Deception Pass, Whidbey Island

silk worms at Deception Pass, Whidbey Island

We didn’t have to stay on Highway 5, but the first sign said the wait was only five minutes – too good to be true as when my mind is made up the second sign said 30 minutes. I wanted Caleb to see Peace Arch and we can take a different way when we come back to the States. We waited in line and watched a man tear a bottle cap off with his teeth – the type most people use bottle openers, lighters, or a hard corner to achieve.

Colebrook Rd. train tracks, BC

Colebrook Rd. train tracks, BC

Once up to the patrol officer – looking badass with his facial hair, awesome haircut, and big sunglasses on – I quickly ask for a stamp. We get denied as he doesn’t have one in his booth, but he is curious about us driving “all the way to Alaska” and going to Bahrain without “arms” when we told him we had to leave our weapons at home.

 

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The other crossings are more laid back. This one forces you to bypass the welcome sign unless you find parking and walk back, but I didn’t want to accidentally park in the second check lot so we drove on towards Vancouver. That’s not the direction we wanted, but it brought us to the May Day Parade happening near Fort Langley – the national park that we didn’t find. We headed east to drive around the pile of islands and go north.

108 Mile House Heritage Museum

108 Mile House Heritage Museum

We did a lot of driving and met with friendly people at every stop. I love Canada. Lots of mountains and fields and a large river with little traffic to interrupt our daydreaming in-between sprinkle storms. We stopped at a gas station where we found a massive-sized new candy bar to try – that the manager asked, “You going to beat him with that later?”, and some rope (to make leashes with) was also met with a sexual comment of, “You going to tie her up later?” Caleb blushed and tried to joke about tying me to the top of the car.

inside 108 Mile House Heritage school

inside 108 Mile House Heritage school

He made leashes as I drove and then we had to find a place to test them out. We found the 108 Mile House Heritage Site where the dogs were able to poop before the rain that had me running back to the car from the washroom. It didn’t look or sound that heavy but I was covered in droplets. We continued to play leapfrog with the few drivers going the same way as us – speeding downhill, struggling uphill, and reversing to get pictures on the flat roads. It was nearing 8:30 pm and the sun was up… and then… it disappeared behind gray clouds and a sheet of rain. I made a left and ended up in the Alamo Motel parking lot.

108 Mile House Heritage lake

108 Mile House Heritage lake

I was debating staying or driving on, but was at least determined to use their washroom. When I came out, Caleb and the manager on duty were talking about traveling across the States and Canada (something they had both done) and Caleb’s job. This got us a discount on the room (with jacuzzi tub) and my mind was made up. We could’ve gotten the RV site for $15, but the temperature will be 42 or so tonight and I think I got spoiled last night. I still felt wishy-washy about pulling over so early if there was still daylight to be had, but that was long gone now. We can go take a relaxing bath, try the new candy bar, and then wake at four in the morning to make the most of tomorrow’s light.

This entry was posted in Animals, Art, Family, History, Marriage, Photography, Travel, Water and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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